Category Archives: Historical sites

The Newly-Renovated Lagusnilad Pedestrian Underpass

Have you been to the newly rehabilitated Lagusnilad Underpass, lately? You would be amazed at how it looks now. It used to have graffiti-laden walls and dilapidated floors now replaced with artistic murals.

Even if you were not from Manila, you would be proud to see how clean and green Lagusnilad underpass, which connects Intramuros to the Manila City Hall.

Photo credit: Dennis Gil

Manila City Mayor Francisco Domagoso led its soft opening on Monday (August 24, 2020).

The murals, according to reports, were created to boost awareness of Filipino art, history, and culture and to bring art to public places. The murals highlight important events in the Philippine history and vibrant photos of Manila’s landmarks, such as Jones Bridge and the New Binondo Chinatown Arch.

There is also a portion in the murals dedicated to frontline workers in the battle against COVID-19, such as medical and delivery workers.

Visitors and passersby would be delighted to see vertical gardens, and signages written in Baybayin to help people navigate the area.

An interactive info desk was placed to provide information about the city.

For those who worry about slippery floors especially the elders worry not. The city government used non-skid tiles for the commuters’ protection especially during the rainy season.

Photo credit: Richmond Chi

The underpass was also given ample lighting and closed-circuit television (CCTV) cameras to ensure the safety of pedestrians.

For those asking about the iconic Books from Underground, it gets to keep its place in the underpass. It was moved near the Manila City Hall entry/exit point of the underpass. The books are stacked in new bookshelves.

The renovation project worth P5 million was made possible by donations from private companies and national government agencies.

Lagusnilad rehabilitation is a collaboration of the city government with the University of Santo Tomas College of Architecture alumni and faculty Arch. Juanito Malaga, John Benedict Fallorina, Sean Patrick Ortiz, Leon Centeno Tuazon; and the National Commission for Culture and the Arts for the underpass’ overall design.

The mural artists: Marianne Rios, Jano Gonzales, and Ianna Engano; while those who made the signages are Raven Angel Rivota, Edrian Garcia, and John Leyson. 

Source: mb.com.ph

Fort Santiago Dungeon is now open

Fort Santiago will reopen its gate to the public beginning February 10 after the success of the biggest architectural festival held in the country this month.

Fort Santiago was the central headquarters of colonial military high command, its dungeons assumed a notorious image.

Image credit: https://www.facebook.com/OfficialIntramurosAdministration/

Black legend surrounding this prison facility states that as the tide rose, prisoners would drown or suffocate as the water depleted the air in the chambers. However, this legend remains a legend for we now know that despite being near a body of water, the entire dungeon facility is actually above sea level, and that the entire cavern complex is actually a small hollowed-out hill adjacent to the Baluarte de Santa Barbara.

Meantime, here’s the updated Intramuros Sites and Museums Admission Fees for your reference.

Right click on the image to enlarge. Image credit: https://www.facebook.com/OfficialIntramurosAdministration/

Santo Niño Shrine Museum

In 2008, hubby and his officemates were able to visit Tacloban City through the auspices of the company’s old patron. One of the places they visited was the Santo Niño Shrine in Tacloban City.

The Santo Niño Shrine used to be one of the 29 presidential rest houses of the late Philippine President Ferdinand Marcos.

Santo Niño is a representation of the infant Jesus Christ. He is the patron saint of Leyte.
In the background is the mosaic of Jesus Christ displayed on the wall.